Deconstructing Diabetes

Simplifying dietary advice for people with diabetes.

Nutrition Consulting, Resources, Blog

Specialised Diabetes Dietitian (APD)

Melbourne,  Australia

Type 1 Diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes is where the pancreas does not produce insulin.

Insulin then needs to be administered by the form of an injection or insulin pump.

Depending on the time since you were diagnosed, the type of insulin regime (basal, mixed insulin, basal - bolus, or insulin pump) you are on, your dietary advice and intake may vary.

Carbohydrate Counting is an important skill for people who adjust insulin doses or on CSII.

Carbohydrate Counting is an important skill for people who adjust insulin doses or on CSII.

Carbohydrate Counting

Being able to count carbohydrate is an essential skill for people who are on insulin adjustment programs, using a smart meter, planning to use, or on an insulin pump (CSII).

Guidelines recommend carbohydrate counting to assist in control of blood glucose levels.

Carbohydrate counting doesn't need to be as complex as some people assume.

We have deconstructed the process of how to count carbohydrate in a series of foods, which allows you to be able to effectively count the carbohydrates in foods with food labels, without food labels, from recipes, and when eating out. 

Knowing which food databases and apps can also assist you with this skill.

Insulin : Carbohydrate Ratio. Keeping blood glucose levels within target after meals is best achieved by carbohydrate counting and an appropriate insulin:carbohydrate ratio. Here the amount of insulin given depends on the amount of carbohydrate eaten.

Insulin : Carbohydrate Ratio.

Keeping blood glucose levels within target after meals is best achieved by carbohydrate counting and an appropriate insulin:carbohydrate ratio.

Here the amount of insulin given depends on the amount of carbohydrate eaten.

Carbohydrate (carb) counting is only one piece of the puzzle, and must be considered as part of the overall dietary intake.

Activity

Activity (exercise) will affect your blood glucose levels. Special attention may need to be made to food, particularly carbohydrate intake before, during and after exercise. This advice may also change depending on your duration and intensity of exercise.

Balancing Carbohydrate, Insulin and Exercise for Blood Glucose Control

Balancing Carbohydrate, Insulin and Exercise for Blood Glucose Control

 

 

Deconstructing Diabetes